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Nice idea, but the problem is that grade school kids simply aren't capable of abstract thought. It's a psychological function that simply isn't developed enough in children, and development of this skill isn't something that can be trained or taught. It'd be like trying to teach a baby how to walk before it can crawl or even sit up on it's own. It just wouldn't work.

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Highline is getting plenty of funding, they just need to budget what they have better.

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Nathan x about 4 years ago on Tech Tosas

I know for a fact that the highschools regularly utilise multiple different technology mediums to teach. I don't think this is an issue.

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#1 I concur. This is just a result of how old the school is.

#2 I think the meals are healthy enough. Pretty ballanced and there's a good variety.

#3 I have personally experienced this. Again, it's just a result of how old the highschool is. It's usually not that bad as long as it isn't hot out to begin with. Does seem silly to have heaters on in 100 degree weather though.

#5 I've never had issues with missing books or projectors. Almost every class has a projector. It's a little excessive almost.

#6 The chairs and desks might be a little beat up sometimes but they are never so bad as to inhibit class dynamics. This is not a problem imo.

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#1 from what I've seen the teachers are pretty competent with the software provided to them

#2 I KNOW there's typing games on elementary school computers, and I'm pretty sure it's an official part of the curriculum as well. In later grades they have dedicated classes like info-tech for learning computer skills.

#3 Every computer lab in the highschools I've seen use the library system's databases for research and online resources. To access some of them you need a library card to log in:
http://www.kcls.org/databases/

#4 The infastructure is there already, it's just a matter of implementing it effectively. Teachers have been encuraged as of this year to start updating their online gradebooks more frequently, the only problem is getting the information to students and parents, which could probably use a little work.

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This is not within the school district's jurisdiction. I suggest you find out who your representative is in olympia and write them a letter.

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That's dumb.

You're a native english speaker in a primarily english speaking community. You are at an advantage. They are non-native speakers and therefore at a disadvantage.

Perhaps gradeschool programs could be implemented on small scales, but to say that it should be part of the primary curriculum is silly. Perhaps a by-request-only program could be made avaliable to those that are interested.

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This could easily be implemented with a reference system. Grade school teachers would simply write a short letter or fill out a form to present to both the middle school and the parrents stating that the student is capable of participating in higher level mathematics. If everyone signs off and the student aggrees then they get in. Simple.

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